ASCII progress bar in Chez Scheme

As an impatient person, I typically use progress bars for any code that takes more than a few minutes to run. In a previous post, I wrote about creating ASCII progress bars in R and Racket. The Racket version depended on the raart module, which "provides an algebraic model of ASCII that can be used for art, user interfaces, and diagrams." Because I'm not aware of any such library for Chez Scheme [1], I was left feeling stuck.

A dataframe record type for Chez Scheme

As an exercise in my Chez Scheme learning journey, I have implemented a dataframe record type and procedures to work with the dataframe record type. Dataframes are column-oriented, tabular data structures useful for data analysis found in several languages including R, Python, Julia, and Go. In this post, I will introduce the dataframe record type and basic procedures for working with dataframes. In subsequent posts, I will describe other dataframe procedures, e.g., filter, sort, aggregate, etc.

Avoiding namespace pollution in R and Chez Scheme

I was reading a blog post that mentioned that Julia has "[w]eak conventions about namespace pollution" and it got me thinking about how I manage namespace pollution in R and Chez Scheme. The short answer is that I don't. I developed bad habits in R centered around writing overly terse code.

Getting started with Chez Scheme and Emacs on Ubuntu

I've been an enthusiastic Mac user for about 12 years, but hardware problems with a recent MacBook Pro and friction surrounding the Catalina upgrade pushed me to evaluate other Unix-like systems. I pulled out an old ASUS laptop that originally had Windows 7(?) installed, but was most recently running CloudReady. I first tried installing FreeBSD because it seemed like an intriguing alternative, but the installation failed on the old hardware. I then tried Debian, but also failed. Finally, I reached for Ubuntu and, true to its reputation as being beginner friendly, was able to successfully complete the installation [1].